Research

  • “Citations, Contexts, and Humanistic Discourse: Toward Automatic Extraction and Classification”

  • Visualization of Historical Knowledge Structures: An Analysis of the Bibliography of Philosophy

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  • Visualizing the Bibliography of Philosophy

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  • Visual First Amendment

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  • LIS 697 Community Building and Engagement

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  • Citation Studies in the Humanities

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  • “Digital Humanities and Libraries: A Conceptual Model”

    Journal of Library Administration 53(1) (2013): 10–26.

    This paper surveys the current locations of digital humanities work, presents a cultural informatics model of libraries and the digital humanities, and situaties digital humanities work within the user-centered paradigm of library and information science.

  • Cultural Heritage Data Visualizations: Using Your Data in Interesting Ways

    with Joan E. Beaudoin (Wayne State) and Maximilian Schich (UT-Dallas)
    Visual Resources Association 2013 Annual Conference
    April 4, 2013

    From pointing to network linkages to identifying trends and outliers, current data visualization tools can also offer unique ways to examine information recorded about cultural materials. This session will provide several presentations on data visualization.

  • The Ethics of Visualization

    Visualization and infographics are widely discussed today, both inside of the academy and in the public at large. But despite its popularity and potential impact, “infovis” has rarely been considered in an ethical light. This work examines the groundwork of infovis ethics and considers several ways in which visualization could give rise to obligations to or for certain groups.

  • Representing Bioethics: The Degrees of Bioethics

    with Amanda Favia

    This is the first in a series of bibliometric studies focusing on the literature of bioethics from 1970 to 2010. This poster places special emphasis on authors’ degree(s), revealing which educational backgrounds are most prominent in the literature, as well as patterns of scholarly communication between disciplines.